Alcoholics Anonymous For Alcohol Addicts support-groups

The Start Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Many people that were alcoholics were able to get over the condition through the help of the groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. The group was founded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith who are both recovering alcoholics in 1935, it began as a community-based fellowship in order to encourage sobriety in many recovering alcoholics. There are 12 traditions that were put in place to help define the reason for the group's existence but first, the famous 12 steps were introduced to help give the meetings some direction. Many people that have recovered from alcoholism always have something positive to say about the group and the help they were accorded.


There are more than 50,000 AA groups in America alone and over 2 million members in the world.


What To Expect From Attending An AA Meeting

For first timers, getting the courage to go to an AA meeting may pose a challenge. The idea of going to a room full of people you don't know you are going through a problem and are seeking help can be intimidating. This feeling is felt by most of the people you'll encounter in the meetings. AA was founded by recovering alcohol addicts and its model has remained till today. Every individual within AA has been through a problem before and has cultivated a unique feeling of community and understanding among recovering alcoholics.


New members are made to feel comfortable New attendees are encouraged to join the discussion, but it is not required. This is because it takes time for one to build trust so they can open up to strangers. After some time, they start feeling at home and find tremendous relief and healing through openly sharing their experiences.


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Closed And Open Meetings

Closed AA meeting is open only for people who are recovering alcohol addicts or the people who are interested in knowing more about how to overcome their addiction.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. This is mainly because some people do not want to involve their families and friends in their struggle with alcoholism and the recovery process. For others, the love and support of friends and family members during meetings is important.


12 Stages Of Recovery

Alcoholics Anonymous is the first group that came up with the 12 stages of achieving addiction recovery which is currently being used by other communities. These steps are written one after another, but group members realise that in fact they go in a circle. Steps may be revisited several times until the member comes to grips with that stage of their recovery process.

Accepting the fact that you are suffering from alcoholism is usually the first stage you go through. Further steps include the following making a firm decision to quit; admitting all your wrongs to yourself and others; making amends for all wrongdoings; and commitment to permanent improvement. Learn more about the twelve steps here.


Why Some People Do Not Go To AA

Most people are not comfortable with attending a meeting with AA and therefore, come up with reasons not to attend. The resistance people have towards attending AA include

  • They doubt that attending the meeting will help
  • They are afraid of confronting someone they know
  • They are not certain whether they have a problem

These excuses may seem insurmountable, but the most important thing is to keep your eyes on what you want to achieve.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. Alcoholism can cause you many years of misery and in the long run you'll realise just how much attending these meetings may save you from.


Identifying An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

There is always an AA group close to where you live. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. We can help you identify the AA meetings near your location and you can choose the type of meeting you want to attend. Please contact 0800 772 3971 today so we can help you find a reliable AA group to help you today.